At the beginning of the 21st Century monsters still roam the remote, and sometimes not so remote, corners of our planet. It is our job to search for them. The Centre for Fortean Zoology [CFZ] is - we believe - the largest professional, scientific and full-time organisation in the world dedicated to cryptozoology - the study of unknown animals. Since 1992 the CFZ has carried out an unparalleled programme of research and investigation all over the world. Since 2009 we have been running the increasingly popular CFZ Blog Network, and although there has been an American branch of the CFZ for over ten years now, it is only now that it has a dedicated blog.

Tuesday, 29 April 2014

THE WEE FOLK OF NEW ENGLAND.

New England has its Little People, equating to the Little People of Europe.  The interesting thing is, just like the Ebu Gogo of Indonesia, there are claims of sightings in modern times.

These beings are called by the Wampanoag Indians and others Pukwudgies.  They are distinctly dangerous where humans are concerned.  They are reputed to have the power of invisibility, use poisoned arrows and employ magic.  They are at most as high as a human's knee - though I suppose that rather depends on the human against whom they are measured.

The Pukwudgies started out as good folk, but it is said their good intentions kept going awry, so they got grumpy and became hostile to humans.  They are said by some to have a sweet smell.  They caused so much trouble for humans that the benevolent giant Maushop sent his five sons to punish them, but the Pukwudgies killed them.  It was also said they later killed Maushop too, but others said he merely wandered out of the area.  They were credited with shapeshifting powers.

An interesting fact, however, is that sightings of Pukwudgies have continued into modern times.  Three of them have been in the Bridgewater State Forest.  One was in a cemetery in New Hampshire.  A considerable number have been reported from Anderson (Indiana). The Anderson sightings have been reported from the Mounds State Park and along the White River at Noblesville.  The Pukwudgies here have been described as wearing blue gowns.

Is there a population of diminutive humanoids behind the legend, hiding, perhaps, in woody fastnesses?  Skeptics may scoff at such a notion, but I feel it would be foolish to say the traditions and sightings have no substance.

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